Make the Most of Your CEEC 2020 Experience!

Blog Post By: Julian Burger

CEEC 2020 is 2 days away! With this in mind, we thought it would be the perfect time to share some tips on how to make the most of your experience. I attended CEEC in my first year at Queen’s and it  was one of the best experiences of my university career to date. The biggest take away for me was that what you put into the weekend is what you’ll get out. So whether your coming alone or with friends, from Queen’s or elsewhere in Canada, here are some tips for maximizing your CEEC experience!

1. Branch out!

It may sound cliche, but getting out of your comfort zone is what CEEC is all about. I know it’s reassuring to go talk to who you know when you get thrown into a room of unfamiliar faces. That being said, CEEC is the perfect opportunity to meet new like- minded people and make lasting connections. Try to break out of your shell as much as possible and introduce yourself to new people! I can guarantee that within five minutes of conversation you will have a lot more in common than you’d expect. 

2. Attend as many events as possible

Morning yoga after a big night out may seem like a stretch but trust me, getting the juices flowing right away is the ideal start to the day. CEEC is a pretty busy three days with constant events going on. Of course, if you have a test or a mandatory lab to attend, school comes first, but I can’t urge you enough to attend as much as possible. A huge part of CEEC is learning a wide variety of perspectives through an array of diverse lenses. Each speaker, workshop or even case brings new insights and may just be what inspires you to pursue a specific career! 

3. Bring your ideas to the table

While everyone at CEEC shares the same passion for sustainability, it is your background and ideas that set you apart! When watching a speaker, ask questions. When participating in a workshop, put forth your ideas. At dinner time, ask your table their opinion on a subject and present yours. You have a unique background whether it be your degree, your work/life experiences or even some cool vacation you went on (Insert exchange). Bring your insights and ideas to the table and you may even leave the weekend with some new ones to share with your friends. 

4. Talk to company reps

In the passed CEEC hasn’t traditionally been a full on recruiting conference. That being said, the conference  is an incredible opportunity to network with a plethora of cool sustainability focused companies and organizations! If you see a representative from a company you’re interested in, go and talk to them! It can seem daunting, but striking up a simple conversation, asking what they do and what got them interested in their job can lead to a future connection and even potential job opportunity. Many CEEC delegates and executive members have landed their jobs through connections at the conference so make the most out of it!

In Better News – The Happy Broadcast

Blog Post By: Jessica Oliver

Blog Post By: Jessica Oliver

The Earth is warming, arctic ice is melting, species are going extinct, fires are burning, and coral reefs are dying. These are just a few of the headlines we see daily. It’s daunting, I know. Sometimes I’m curious to read the whole story and other times I can’t seem to bring myself to, as it makes me feel helpless. It is important to understand the issues our world is facing and to take action, but it is also important to step back and recognize our successes.

As a start to the new year 2020, I want to recognize the positive impacts that occurred in 2019. I follow an Instagram account and blog called “the happy broadcast”, which reports on all the positive occurrences in the world. Here are a few examples from https://www.thehappybroadcast.com/

  1. “Italy to become first nation where students in every grade will be required to study climate change and sustainability.”
  2. “Costa Rica has doubled its tropical rainforests in just a few decades thanks to a continued environmental focus by policy makers.”
  3. “Scotland produced enough wind energy to power all its homes twice over in first half of 2019.”
  4. “Thailand supermarket says no to plastic packaging and wraps produce in banana leaves.”

In the midst of overwhelming headlines spurring anxious feelings, these positive reports serve as examples of the power of collaboration and demonstrate what we can achieve. Although recognizing our downfalls may motivate some, emphasizing our successes is equally as valuable to empower and encourage action. Let’s keep the ball rolling in 2020.

Traveling During the Climate Crisis: How to Be a More Eco-conscious Explorer

Blog post by: Maggie Tuer

Last January, I embarked on an eight-month adventure around Australia, New Zealand, Thailand, and Vietnam. The time that I spent exploring these incredible countries was without a doubt my favourite thing that I have done in my life thus far. Travelling to new places every week, living out of a rental car, and booking flights the day of was the exact kind of lifestyle that I had always craved.  Being able to finally set out on this adventure felt truly remarkable. However, being an environmental science student and someone who is passionate about sustainability in all aspects of my life, I could not rid myself of the ever-increasing guilt that my travels were having a negative impact on my carbon footprint and my overall contribution to the climate crisis.

         I would find myself looking around and be absolutely horrified by the waste and emissions associated with my explorations. As a result, I began to document a number of the issues that I found most problematic…

1. Airplane Waste

         On the majority of my flights, meals were served in disposable, plastic containers. Almost all of these meals were accompanied by disposable water bottles. A number of times when I informed the stewardess that I did not need a bottle of water, it was simply thrown out. On top of this, many airlines lacked adequate vegetarian options, with many failing to offer them on the menu at all.

2. Airplane Emissions

         Of course, one of the most detrimental environmental impacts of travelling is aviation emissions. One round trip flight from New York to Europe creates a warming effect equivalent of 2 or 3 tons of carbon dioxide per person. To put this into context, the average American generates an average of 19 tons of carbon dioxide per year. I knew that this would be an issue going into my months of travels, but I have to say that I was disappointed by the number of airlines that failed to offer a carbon offset program.

3. Disposable Water Bottles

         This was particularly an issue in countries in Southeast Asia due to their lack of access to clean drinking water. Unfortunately, as a result of this situation, almost all water that was provided on tours, in hotels, Airbnb’s, or in restaurants and cafés, came in plastic disposable water bottles.

4. Tourist Impacts on Environment

         I spent the majority of my time away in New Zealand, as I was studying abroad there for almost 5 months. I genuinely have never seen such a pristine and beautiful place – after all, the country’s slogan is ‘100% Pure New Zealand’. Unfortunately, however, I noticed that the onslaught of tourists in National Parks and other conservation areas often led to a significant impact on the natural environment through traffic on hiking trails, wilderness campsites etc.

5. Inefficient Hotel Operations

         This is a critical issue no matter where you are in the world. Many hotels clean their linens every single day, have air conditioning in operation 24/7, and lack effective recycling programs. This was no different in the Southern Hemisphere. Particularly in Southeast Asia with its viciously humid climate, the air conditioning in hotels was constantly on full blast.

         It was certainly easy to feel disheartened by all of these issues, but rather than simply accept this as a sad reality, I tried my best to do everything I could to reduce my own personal impact as a traveller. Here are some of the ways I dealt with these obstacles…

  • Airplane Waste

         When it came to airplane food, I tried to reduce my waste by bringing snacks in my own re-usable containers. I also got in the habit of requesting vegetarian meals 24 hours in advance of the flight. Airlines such as Quantas are much better about using sustainable and re-usable packaging for hot meals, and I made sure to take this into account when booking flights.

  • Plane Emissions

         While aviation emissions are fairly hard to avoid when you need to get from point A to point B, there are a number of things to keep in mind in order to lessen your footprint. Planes expend the most fuel when taking off and landing, so the eco-friendliest decision is to take the most direct flight possible (even if it costs a little more). I also found that travelling by car is not only a sustainable decision but leads to some of the best adventures. Particularly in New Zealand, every glance out of your window provides an entirely new landscape, and any backroad or beach can easily become your home for the night or week.

  • Water Bottles

         This was probably the hardest wasteful obstacle to manage. While it went against every fibre in my being to purchase multiple disposable bottles a day, I quickly found that my guilt was leading me to be extremely dehydrated. It was difficult to find an alternative, sustainable solution. After returning home, however, I spoke with my peers about how they dealt with this issue while travelling in developing countries. I was told that purchasing a life straw or another form of effective water filter can be a great option. Using one of the products, you can simply fill your own reusable water bottle when there is access to running water and can say no to disposables.

  • Tourist Impacts

         In order to avoid being simply another adventurer making a mark on an already significantly altered landscape, I always opted to take the road less travelled. Staying clear of the most heavily utilized paths not only lessens your impact on the environment, but it also makes for a much more enjoyable hiking/trekking experience. At the same time however, I was conscious about always remaining on marked trails, and only staying the night in areas where camping was permitted. While exploring the backcountry can be thrilling, it is not acceptable to put your own adventure ahead of the conservation of the ecosystem that you find yourself in.  

  • Inefficient Hotel Operations

         This one is fairly easy to avoid if you are travelling on a budget. I stayed almost exclusively in hostels and Airbnbs as opposed to hotels, and while occasionally the heat became too much to bear, I predominantly opted for ‘fan only’ rooms to save energy. Additionally, I only did laundry when I felt it absolutely necessary – although I’m sure some of my travel companions would have preferred otherwise!

         I encourage absolutely everyone to get out there and explore everything our incredible planet has to offer. In doing so, however, always try and be as mindful and considerate as possible of the fragility and complexities of our natural world. Happy travels!!

5 Reasons Why You Should Apply to CEEC

1. Find motivation towards your passion points

The margin of having only a 2-degree leeway in global temperature increase is a terrifying statistic. Facing the extent of the reality that is the human and ecological crisis can be overwhelming and stress-inducive. It becomes easy to get stunned by the facts and lose track of knowing where to start. CEEC will address climate issues head on while exploring possible solutions to making change towards a sustainable economy.

2. Get first-hand experience from industry leaders in sustainable fields

At CEEC, keynote speakers and panellists are brought in from all across the world. We aim to bring a diverse group of industry professionals that offer unique approaches to solving the climate crisis. In the three days of CEEC, you will be exposed to industry professionals ranging from decision makers in leading sustainable firms to start-up companies exploring new pathways towards innovative solutions.

3. Make meaningful connections with like-minded people

CEEC is more than just a conference on sustainability and innovation. It is a forum for people who are driven to make long term change to connect and learn from each other. Our case competition and innovation competition provide the opportunity to work in teams while exploring solutions towards real time climate issues. By working together delegates are able to build strong connections and leave the conference knowing a new community of people who share the same values.

4. Opportunity to be a part of change

As a global society we are on the cusp of change. We can make drastic change now or face the consequences of 2 degree warming.  Here at CEEC we know that innovation, flow of capital and an open mind are imperative drivers in making the change we need. Our keynote speakers and panellist will engage in these topics, while the case and innovation challenge will allow you as a delegate to take a hands-on approach to work towards a revolution.  

5. Network with potential employers

As a collective our goal is to unite passionate scholars to the leaders of the emerging environmental industry. When you apply to CEEC, we send your resume directly to industry professionals participating in our conference. The CEEC tradeshow provides a unique opportunity for partners to showcase their business and for delegates to network with active recruiters. Key note speakers are assigned to delegate tables during meals, creating an open environment for intellectual conversation. 

The Future of Data is Green!

Our future will be built on data. Of that there is no question. With this immutable destination in mind, it becomes incredibly important for us to realize the risks and benefits of our path we take as society progresses.

Data centres in the United States consume 2% of the electricity produced nation-wide. This seems shocking, yet it’s common knowledge that large information and technology corporations such as Google and Microsoft have massive warehouses full of computers optimized for data storage. Although it stands that these computers should be optimized for another factor: sustainability.

Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon have all pledged to run their data centres on sustainable energy, with Microsoft in fast pursuit. It’s this corporate responsibility and dedication to the environment which will set high industry standards that will only benefit our growing sustainable goals.

Click here to find out more!

Cape Town Is Running Out of Water!

Did you know the Cape Town is precariously close to running out of water! The second largest city in South Africa is experiencing the worst drought in recent decades. The city is working on mass water recycling programs to push back the current 100 days of water they have left.

Click here to find out more.

The Smartest Cities Are Green Cities

How do you convince 93% of your population to walk, bike, or take public transportation? You build a city that prioritizes energy conservation and clean energy generation. Check out this week’s Green Feed article to learn more about the innovative smart-city technologies that let the top green cities in the world lead the way to self sustaining urban life. Click here  to read more!

 

 

 

Green Bonds Are Sustainable (In Every Way!)

Money and plant with hand with filter effect retro vintage style

Between 2015 and 2016, the total value of Green Bonds issued has doubled to $81 Billion! Given the fact that this value is expected to double yet again by the end of 2017, this marks what some are considering the beginning of a flourishing new asset class.

With the widespread adoption of environmental policies from countries worldwide, there is a mass amount of green infrastructure to be built in the coming years. Experts think that Green Bonds will be a pivotal tool for pushing this development through to completion. To read more about the Green Bond’s opportunity for social impact AND market yield, click here!

Coca-Cola Leads the Way In Renewable Packaged Goods

In Coca-Cola’s attempt to reduce their dependence on fossil fuels, we can all look forward to the implementation of their PlantBottle. The product is made entirely of sugar-cane derived plastic, with the goal of using exclusively green packaging by 2020. Coca-Cola hopes to lead the packaged goods industry away from its dependence on non-renewably sourced plastic.

Their comments: “It hasn’t been an easy task, but it shows our commitment to doing the right thing int he right way.”

You can read more here.

Fisheries On Demand: The Future of Aquaculture

Last year the United States of America consumed 4.8 billion pounds of seafood, 50% of which is supported by fish farms. A method of fishing consisting of isolating a ‘pen’ of water to securely harvest fish from. What’s the problem with this? In addition to the societal overconsumption of fish, fish farms are stationary. This means that the pens are trapped within the produced waste of millions of fish. This often leads to disease, and the complete desertification and destruction of nearby ecosystems from increased toxicity.

Cue an innovative solution: InnovaSea is attempting to create free-floating domes which will seemingly solve the problem. What’s more? Not only will these pods ensure that the produced waste is distributed across the ocean safely and effectively, but these pods will actually utilize ocean currents to DELIVER matured fish to shipping ports across the world.

To see the effects of a collaboration between innovation, business and nature the following video goes into amazing details about the Aquapod A3600.  And as always, feel free to read more at this link. 

 

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